And No Religion Too-hoo

I recently joined a FB group for people who share the same illness I have been managing. This particular group has a ”no religious content” stipulation in its rules. Ok, I thought. I’m just here to glean helpful info and don’t plan to evangelize the group.

This morning, this post came across my feed:

FYI the ‘no religious content’ rule also covers the use of religious iconography and religious emojis such as the Buddha’s head and praying hands. These are harder to catch by the admin team so we might miss them in a thread but that doesn’t mean that they are allowed. Comments containing religious emojis will be removed by the admin team.

This was in response to this post by a member:

Hello admin.

Sincere apologies that I did the icon with 2 hands together. I meant it as a thank you gesture and did not see it as religious.

My mistake.

In Japanese it means please or thank you. Young people use it for that rather than religious. Also Hand together emoji Meaning. Depicting two hands pressed together and fingers pointed up, Folded Hands is variously used as thanks, request, and greeting as well to express such sentiments as hope, praise, gratitude, reverence, and respect.

Thanks for pointing it out to me. I simply had no idea.

Several comments posted in which members say they use the emoji all the time, though they’re atheists, simply as a heartfelt thank you. One person explained the precise translation of ”Namaste,” which is not religious, and is used widely the world over with this gesture.

The Admin replied:

It can have any of those 3 meanings: high five, thank you, or prayer.

We can’t always tell what the intent is, so just ask folks not to use.

Followed by:

An admin turned off commenting for this post.

If I take time to muse about these exchanges, my mind reels. But I’m going to sit with this awhile and probably write a follow-up post.

What are your thoughts?

3 thoughts on “And No Religion Too-hoo

  1. Salvageable

    I find it hard to respond to your question. I have never joined a group that openly censored religious expressions. I understand your desire to gain understanding and support for your medical concerns.
    On second thought, a group that spends that much time pondering whether a simple emoji is or is not religious probably will not have much success keeping religious expressions of their site. J.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. madblog Post author

      I just joined a few days ago and I did not know about the uncompromising nature of the admins. Many groups have a rule about overt expressions of faith, simply to avoid arguments which often invite ugliness and to encourage that you stick to the group topic. But I have never seen a group enforce that as allergically as this!
      And yes exactly. Even the atheists, not to mention those who pointed out the International /cultural validity of such emojis, were incredulous at the intolerance of the admin. Once they’re looking for ghosts under every bed, they’re going to see them e erywhere.

      Like

      Reply
  2. madblog Post author

    Update:
    A post in this group asked what fellow sufferers do when they feel their worst. I responded. See the Admins response below.

    Feedback about your removed comment
    You’ll be able to see these details until May 4, 2022.
    Madelyn Lang
    2h
    I’m not allowed to say in this group.
    Group rules that were violated
    Do not argue, ignore, or block any of the admins.
    Additional notes from the admins
    If you know you’re not allowed, don’t allude to it. This just invites curiosity and drama.

    Like

    Reply

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