Category Archives: Life

Watch This Video Clip

“I am sick and tired of being told that without the right to kill, and without the right to take a human life, I am somehow not equal.”

This young woman in Ireland is making substantive point after point. Today, Ireland will vote on whether to allow the abortion plague into their culture. Please pray for the righteous outcome.

Cecile Richards has told us: “Women are not free without abortion.”

Compare and contrast.

Advertisements

“No person should be forced out of the only place they’ve ever called home.”

Cecile Richards quotes are irony gold. I wonder if it’s possible for her to say, “Pass the salt” without the cook questioning his over-seasoning. Maybe it’s all been a brilliant conceptual stand-up act and literally everything she says is backwards.

Remember while you read that Cecile Richards, during her tenure as President of Planned Parenthood, presided over the termination of many millions of unborn human beings. Please read each quote, pause, and reflect before you read the next.

The next generation is what gives me hope.

Someone always has to be the mom.

Part of the way you win is by being good at strategy. Part of the way you also win is by surviving, and enjoying yourself, having more fun than the other side, and persisting.

Everyone deserves health care.

Early on, I had an experience that crystallized for me why the fight for reproductive rights—the fight to give every person the opportunity and freedom to live their best life—is so important.

Planned Parenthood may have been the only thing standing between them and an uncertain future.

I hope that we leave here even more inspired to fight for all people. Because nobody is free until everybody is free.

We believe health care isn’t a privilege. It’s a fundamental human right.

No human is illegal.

Whatever the future holds, I’ll always be committed to that revolutionary idea and all those who refuse to settle for a world where women are anything less than full equals.

No person should be forced out of the only place they’ve ever called home.

 

10 Ways Large Families Save the (Earth) World

1. I just finished wiping the icing off the bottoms of a bunch of birthday candles. I’m going to need those again in ten days, and again less than a month later. Why would I buy new ones when these still have a good inch and a half? Crumbs of old homemade icing never hurt anyone yet. I bet moms of two kids buy a new set of candles every birthday and throw them away.

Also, homemade-from-scratch cake costs about 1/20th of a bakery cake and tastes 20x better. Hydrogenated shortening kills; real butter doesn’t.

2. My son needed to do zero adjusting when he went to college and shared a room with two other guys. He shared a room with two guys at home too. Maybe my boys were unusual, but they never fought over territory. So at college my son was perfectly content with his bed and his desk; he let the other guys vie for lebensraum.

3. It is essential to learn patience when eight people share one bathroom. It is equally essential to learn sympathy and consideration for others (‘ bladders).

4. Bags and bags of clothing used to show up on our porch. We had never asked for hand-me-downs; people just assumed we could use them. They were right and we were thankful. It would have been difficult indeed to buy new clothes every season for every child. Most of the clothing we received was in like-new condition, and a lot of the items had price-tags.

Perhaps the most valuable component of these acts of generosity was that my kids learned that a second-hand item in good condition does not differ one iota from a brand-new one. There is shame neither in sharing nor receiving, and there is nothing which so inspires giving than receiving.

5. My kids are now adults who don’t expect the world to hand them all the amenities– partly because we didn’t teach them to expect gifts except on Christmas and their birthdays. They didn’t expect candy except on Christmas, Easter, and Halloween.

My oldest daughter was honestly judgmental about her friends expecting big gifts for Easter and lesser holidays. My kids know how to delay gratification, and although they do not always practice it, they know how to be frugal.

6. Reduce, reuse, recycle. It was our lifestyle before the motto was coined. I was raised by children of the Depression and learned to make my spending count. When I was growing up, we didn’t spend money on non-essentials but we had all we needed. We weren’t used to vacations and we were usually the last of our friends to get the latest tech like color TV.

We raised our kids with the same mindset: one not deprivation but careful frugality. Spend when you need to without regret, but save whenever you can for future needs. We didn’t spend much on vacations. We drove our cars until they were junk. Eating out or ordering in was a rare special occasion.

7. Contrary to popular assumption, big families have small footprints. We eight use approximately the same resources that the four of you, or the two of you, do.

At the same time they condemn parents of several kids for selfish and wasteful American materialism, my childfree acquaintances espouse the superior lifestyle of spontaneously flying the globe, to stay at the priciest family-free resorts, indulging themselves in only the finest and most select perks that the self-absorbed can devise. Driving further to shop for only the trendiest fair trade items.

I’ll compare my eight-person staycation expenses to your two-person dream trip any day you like. Guess who comes out using up more of earth’s precious resources? Virtue-signaling and Childfree -signaling don’t mix.

8. Happy families. Positive family experiences. Fostering a concept of unconditional belonging. We believe that being plunked in the middle of a bunch of other difficult human beings is actually according to a wise plan; we are each more or less compelled to learn how to live in peace with these other people, which teaches us valuable lessons about how to get along in a world full of other people.

9. Raising people who want to have children and build families, and who see the importance and enduring value of pouring their lives into others and investing themselves in creating a unique family culture which will continue to influence after they are gone.

In other words, small footprints may lead to small footprints.

10. Today, a large family orientation usually develops within a faith orientation. Our society has moved toward smaller families with the advent of birth control and the cult of personal fulfillment. I might also say with the de-emphasis of faith culture and the growth of materialist culture. It is counter cultural to have large families and, counterintuitively, large families very often happen due to deliberate choice. That choice usually derives from faith in the intrinsic value of each person, given by a gracious God.

Because of this faith orientation, the lessons of other-centeredness, the value of family, the hope of enduring heritage, good stewardship of material wealth, sustainability, recycling and reusing–all part of a whole.

Bonus reason: I love my big family.

 

 

 

 

 

Cecile Quotes are Irony Gold

The next generation is what gives me hope.

Part of the way you win is by being good at strategy. Part of the way you also win is by surviving, and enjoying yourself, having more fun than the other side, and persisting.

Everyone deserves health care.

Early on, I had an experience that crystallized for me why the fight for reproductive rights—the fight to give every person the opportunity and freedom to live their best life—is so important.

Planned Parenthood may have been the only thing standing between them and an uncertain future.

I hope that we leave here even more inspired to fight for all people. Because nobody is free until everybody is free.

We believe health care isn’t a privilege. It’s a fundamental human right. No human is illegal.

Whatever the future holds, I’ll always be committed to that revolutionary idea and all those who refuse to settle for a world where women are anything less than full equals.

No person should be forced out of the only place they’ve ever called home.

To be continued.

 

 

Thoughts on a Horror

I invite you to think about these things.

We live in a world where a person can walk into a school full of defenseless children and shoot, and shoot, and shoot. Without empathy, feeling only hate and power. Without regard for any code or consequence, God or man.

Rather than register shock and horror, then eagerly place that item on a back shelf marked: ABERRATION; let us acknowledge that we really do live in such a world.

But let us also notice that against that one evil act, we can counter with several acts which were its polar opposite. In fact, that evil act was countered with several (at least) selfless and noble acts.

A football coach shielded students from bullets with his body, and died. A geography teacher ushered students into his classroom for protection but never made it inside. A quick-thinking ROTC student protected 60 to 70 people from gunshots behind Kevlar. Another teacher hid 19 students in a closet. A janitor warned about 40 students that they were running toward the shooter, and ushered them into a safe classroom. A 15 year old held the door for fellow fleeing students but was shot dead.

In the face of that evil act, these people responded by trying to save the lives of other people at the expense of their own. That requires incredible empathy, other-centered-ness, and self-sacrifice.

Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends

It suggest belief that there is right and wrong, good and evil; that life is objectively valuable and better than death. And a belief that such horror and hate ought to be met with its opposite.

We live in that world too.

But we tend to live in the world of our mind’s making, the one in which we feel comfortable, the world as we imagine it. We might even secretly congratulate ourselves for choosing the world we do. I’m the kind of person who sees the world positively, so I’m a loving person. Or I see the world as tough and harsh, because I’m strong and a realist.

But those imaginary worlds don’t prepare us for the real one. It might be better to recognize the world we live in so that we can encounter it usefully. We can recognize that pure nihilism can cross our path, and we can choose to respond with selfless love.

That there will be more evil there is no doubt. Let us be prepared.

There are many other thoughts you may have on this matter. This was one.

 

 

 

Most Democrat Congresspersons Vote Against Medical Care for Infants Who Survive Abortion

On January 19, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Born Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act — legislation protecting babies who survive abortions.

H.R. 4712 contains an explicit requirement that a baby born alive during an abortion must be afforded “the same degree” of care that would apply “to any other child born alive at the same gestational age,” including transportation to a hospital. This language does not dictate bona fide medical judgments nor require futile measures, but rather, requires that babies born alive during abortions are treated in the same manner as those who are spontaneously born prematurely.

House Passes Pro-Life Bill Protecting Babies Born Alive After Botched Abortions

One hundred and eighty-three congresspersons, all Democrat, voted against the bill.  Zero Republicans voted against it.

235 Republicans voted for the bill. Six Democrats also voted in favor.

FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 36

One hundred and eighty three people who have attained the honorable station of legislator in the great nation of the U.S. voted to allow the denial of  medical care to tiny infants who are living after their abortion attempt. In the past these babies have been left to die or sometimes actively killed. Rep. Blackburn: “We have heard horror stories of babies being strangled, suffocated, or neglected to die.”

Someone ought to tell the honorable Democratic Congresspersons that this is not the moral high ground.