Category Archives: Life

We’re Doomed

I’ve been on twitter today, commenting a lot, which is unusual. I have got myself in a “conversation”, if we can call a conversation a back-and-forth where you cannot see the comment before the last one and you don’t know what you’re responding to sometimes. Twitter isn’t designed for conversations but for gotchas.

Lila Rose tweeted about the poor baby that a celebrity male couple have adopted through surrogacy, and commented that she felt sympathy for the loss this child has already experienced. At one point I added,”Adopting a child who has lost parents is a noble act. Creating a child to be separated from its parents is the opposite of noble. Both types of children have suffered tragic losses but we should not inflict them.”

Oh my goodness. Among the usual suspects of replies one should expect in response to  such playbook issues, I also received replies which asserted the following:

The child is part of the mother’s body and she can do what she wants with it

After the child is born, she can still do what she wants with her property

A woman can donate her baby just as she can donate an organ

The baby is dependent on the mother’s body so yes it it her body

Until we have Brave New a World babies which are not dependent on the woman, women can do whatever the f they want with their babies

A baby is part of her body yes it is all science says so

I argued that neither children nor fetuses are possessions, nor slaves, but to no avail. I’m scared.

The Burden May Fall From Our Backs

There is a case to be made that all Americans have been enslaved since 1973, most of us unwillingly, to the Institution of Abortion; and that we may now have hope for freedom.

Like Pilgrim, we have sorrowfully carried this burden, unwillingly complicit. What joy it will be if we become free of it.

Watch This Video Clip

“I am sick and tired of being told that without the right to kill, and without the right to take a human life, I am somehow not equal.”

This young woman in Ireland is making substantive point after point. Today, Ireland will vote on whether to allow the abortion plague into their culture. Please pray for the righteous outcome.

Cecile Richards has told us: “Women are not free without abortion.”

Compare and contrast.

“No person should be forced out of the only place they’ve ever called home.”

Cecile Richards quotes are irony gold. I wonder if it’s possible for her to say, “Pass the salt” without the cook questioning his over-seasoning. Maybe it’s all been a brilliant conceptual stand-up act and literally everything she says is backwards.

Remember while you read that Cecile Richards, during her tenure as President of Planned Parenthood, presided over the termination of many millions of unborn human beings. Please read each quote, pause, and reflect before you read the next.

The next generation is what gives me hope.

Someone always has to be the mom.

Part of the way you win is by being good at strategy. Part of the way you also win is by surviving, and enjoying yourself, having more fun than the other side, and persisting.

Everyone deserves health care.

Early on, I had an experience that crystallized for me why the fight for reproductive rights—the fight to give every person the opportunity and freedom to live their best life—is so important.

Planned Parenthood may have been the only thing standing between them and an uncertain future.

I hope that we leave here even more inspired to fight for all people. Because nobody is free until everybody is free.

We believe health care isn’t a privilege. It’s a fundamental human right.

No human is illegal.

Whatever the future holds, I’ll always be committed to that revolutionary idea and all those who refuse to settle for a world where women are anything less than full equals.

No person should be forced out of the only place they’ve ever called home.

 

10 Ways Large Families Save the (Earth) World

1. I just finished wiping the icing off the bottoms of a bunch of birthday candles. I’m going to need those again in ten days, and again less than a month later. Why would I buy new ones when these still have a good inch and a half? Crumbs of old homemade icing never hurt anyone yet. I bet moms of two kids buy a new set of candles every birthday and throw them away.

Also, homemade-from-scratch cake costs about 1/20th of a bakery cake and tastes 20x better. Hydrogenated shortening kills; real butter doesn’t.

2. My son needed to do zero adjusting when he went to college and shared a room with two other guys. He shared a room with two guys at home too. Maybe my boys were unusual, but they never fought over territory. So at college my son was perfectly content with his bed and his desk; he let the other guys vie for lebensraum.

3. It is essential to learn patience when eight people share one bathroom. It is equally essential to learn sympathy and consideration for others (‘ bladders).

4. Bags and bags of clothing used to show up on our porch. We had never asked for hand-me-downs; people just assumed we could use them. They were right and we were thankful. It would have been difficult indeed to buy new clothes every season for every child. Most of the clothing we received was in like-new condition, and a lot of the items had price-tags.

Perhaps the most valuable component of these acts of generosity was that my kids learned that a second-hand item in good condition does not differ one iota from a brand-new one. There is shame neither in sharing nor receiving, and there is nothing which so inspires giving than receiving.

5. My kids are now adults who don’t expect the world to hand them all the amenities– partly because we didn’t teach them to expect gifts except on Christmas and their birthdays. They didn’t expect candy except on Christmas, Easter, and Halloween.

My oldest daughter was honestly judgmental about her friends expecting big gifts for Easter and lesser holidays. My kids know how to delay gratification, and although they do not always practice it, they know how to be frugal.

6. Reduce, reuse, recycle. It was our lifestyle before the motto was coined. I was raised by children of the Depression and learned to make my spending count. When I was growing up, we didn’t spend money on non-essentials but we had all we needed. We weren’t used to vacations and we were usually the last of our friends to get the latest tech like color TV.

We raised our kids with the same mindset: one not deprivation but careful frugality. Spend when you need to without regret, but save whenever you can for future needs. We didn’t spend much on vacations. We drove our cars until they were junk. Eating out or ordering in was a rare special occasion.

7. Contrary to popular assumption, big families have small footprints. We eight use approximately the same resources that the four of you, or the two of you, do.

At the same time they condemn parents of several kids for selfish and wasteful American materialism, my childfree acquaintances espouse the superior lifestyle of spontaneously flying the globe, to stay at the priciest family-free resorts, indulging themselves in only the finest and most select perks that the self-absorbed can devise. Driving further to shop for only the trendiest fair trade items.

I’ll compare my eight-person staycation expenses to your two-person dream trip any day you like. Guess who comes out using up more of earth’s precious resources? Virtue-signaling and Childfree -signaling don’t mix.

8. Happy families. Positive family experiences. Fostering a concept of unconditional belonging. We believe that being plunked in the middle of a bunch of other difficult human beings is actually according to a wise plan; we are each more or less compelled to learn how to live in peace with these other people, which teaches us valuable lessons about how to get along in a world full of other people.

9. Raising people who want to have children and build families, and who see the importance and enduring value of pouring their lives into others and investing themselves in creating a unique family culture which will continue to influence after they are gone.

In other words, small footprints may lead to small footprints.

10. Today, a large family orientation usually develops within a faith orientation. Our society has moved toward smaller families with the advent of birth control and the cult of personal fulfillment. I might also say with the de-emphasis of faith culture and the growth of materialist culture. It is counter cultural to have large families and, counterintuitively, large families very often happen due to deliberate choice. That choice usually derives from faith in the intrinsic value of each person, given by a gracious God.

Because of this faith orientation, the lessons of other-centeredness, the value of family, the hope of enduring heritage, good stewardship of material wealth, sustainability, recycling and reusing–all part of a whole.

Bonus reason: I love my big family.

 

 

 

 

 

Cecile Quotes are Irony Gold

The next generation is what gives me hope.

Part of the way you win is by being good at strategy. Part of the way you also win is by surviving, and enjoying yourself, having more fun than the other side, and persisting.

Everyone deserves health care.

Early on, I had an experience that crystallized for me why the fight for reproductive rights—the fight to give every person the opportunity and freedom to live their best life—is so important.

Planned Parenthood may have been the only thing standing between them and an uncertain future.

I hope that we leave here even more inspired to fight for all people. Because nobody is free until everybody is free.

We believe health care isn’t a privilege. It’s a fundamental human right. No human is illegal.

Whatever the future holds, I’ll always be committed to that revolutionary idea and all those who refuse to settle for a world where women are anything less than full equals.

No person should be forced out of the only place they’ve ever called home.

To be continued.